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Eidos confirms website hack, email addresses and resumes stolen

Eidos Interactive

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Eidos has revealed that resumes of job hunters and email addresses of video game fans have been stolen by hackers in an attack on the Eidos and “Deus Ex: Human Revolutionwebsites.

Square Enix, the parent company of Eidos, confirmed the hack in a PDF press release. (Why do companies publish their press releases as PDFs, anyway? That’s just daft.)

Here’s part of the statement from Square Enix:

Square Enix can confirm a group of hackers gained access to parts of our Eidosmontreal.com website as well as two of our product sites. We immediately took the sites offline to assess how this had happened and what had been accessed, then took further measures to increase the security of these and all of our websites, before allowing the sites to go live again.

Eidosmontreal.com does not hold any credit card information or code data, however there are resumes which are submitted to the website by people interested in jobs at the studio. Regrettably up to 350 of these resumes may have been accessed, and we are in the process of writing to each of the individuals who may have been affected to offer our sincere apologies for this situation. In addition, we have also discovered that up to 25,000 email addresses were obtained as a result of this breach. These email addresses are not linked to any additional personal information. They were site registration email addresses provided to us for users to receive product information updates.

There are two main risks here.

One threat is that if your email address is one of the 25,000 that has been stolen, you could receive a scam email (perhaps containing a malicious link or attached Trojan horse) that pretends to come from a video game company. After all, the hackers know that you’re interested enough in video games to give your email address to Eidos.

Secondly, the resumes from job hunters. This is a more serious problem. Just think of all the personal information you include on your CV: full name, date of birth, email and home address, telephone number, job history. This kind of information is a god-send to identity thieves interested in defrauding internet users.

So, it seems Sony is not the only video game company to be having problems with its computer security.

Lets hope the continuing stream of stories of companies having customer data stolen from them makes them take security more seriously in the future.

More information about the hack can be found on the KrebsOnSecurity blog.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

FBI says you’ve been visiting illegal websites? It’s a malware attack

The Seal of the United States Federal Bureau o...

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Cybercriminals have spammed out a malicious attack, posing as a notification from the FBI that you have been visiting illegal websites.

Illegal websites email claiming to come from the FBI

A typical message reads as follows:

Subject: You visit illegal websites
Attached file: Document.zip

Message body:
Sir/Madam, we have logged your IP-address on more than 40 illegal Websites. Important: Please answer our questions! The list of questions are attached.

If you make the mistake of running the program in the attached ZIP file, you’ll find that your computer is hit with a fake anti-virus attack – designed to scare you into handing over your credit card details.

Sophos products intercept the email messages as spam, and also detect the attachment as Mal/Bredo-K and Troj/BredoZp-DM.

Of course, if you have your wits about you you would realise that the email looks very suspicious in the first place. But there’s always the danger that some folks will be so worried that the FBI believes they might have been visiting naughty websites, that they’ll click on unsolicited email attachments without thinking.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

Google bug disables 150000 Gmail accounts

Yesterday around 150000 Gmail users account were disabled by the Google system. They lost all their emails, attachments and chat logs. Google explained that approximately 0.08% of its users were affected by this bug. This bug reset all these accounts and even sent them the Google start up mail that any new user of Gmail receives.

Google reported on its dashboard that the engineers are working to get the problem fixed and restore full access. When the Google spokesman was contacted, a clear message was sent across stating that all the mails and accounts would be restored. Though many users are still apprehensive about the fact that all their messages would be restored.

Meanwhile others are advised to take precautions and store a backup of all their emails. There is a free application for Mac, PC and Linux called Gmail Backup. This is quick and easy to use. After downloading this software, Google asks for your account details and begins backing up your emails securely. Users have suggested various other sites for backing up their emails as many found that this software is not supported with Mac. Some of the popular ones are backupify.com and eternos.com.

Facebook – The face of Egypt’s revolution!!!

An Egyptian father has proudly named his daughter “facebook”. According to Al-Ahram(one of the most popular newspapers in Egypt), he did so in tribute to the role the social media service played in organizing the protests in Tahrir Square and beyond.

Wael Ghonim, “We Are Khaled Said” Facebook page showed up within 5 days of Said’s death in June and served as a hub for dissidence against Egyptian police brutality and anti-government protests until Mubarak’s resignation. Other activist pages like “Tahrir Square” cropped up shortly afterward. There are five million Facebook users in Egypt, more so than any other country in the Middle East/North Africa region. Facebook itself has reported an increase in Egyptian users in the past month, with 32,000 Facebook groups and 14,000 pages created in the two weeks after January 25th .

Facebook has become the umbrella symbol for how social media can spread the message of freedom. There was a graffiti in Cairo that said “Thank you Facebook” as a protest sign and Wael Ghonim himself personally expressed his gratitude to Mark Zuckerberg on CNN.

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