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Visit the New Facebook? Hacker warning spreads like wildfire on social network

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

Facebook users are posting warnings to one another about a hacker operating on the network, using the offer to “Visit the new Facebook” to break into pages and kick out the page’s legitimate administrators.

Unfortunately the alerts do not include enough information to be useful, and members of the public may be unwittingly perpetuating a hoax in the belief that they are helping their friends, family and online chums avoid a nasty virus infection.

Visit the new Facebook warning

THIS NOTICE IS DIRECTED TO EVERYONE WHO HAS A PAGE ON FACEBOOK: IF SOME PEOPLE IN YOUR PROFILE OR YOUR FRIENDS SEND YOU A LINK WITH WORDS "VISIT THE NEW FACEBOOK '' AND THERE IS THE LINK BELOW, DO NOT OPEN! IF YOU OPEN IT YOU CAN SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR PAGE. IT'S A HACKER WHO STEALS YOUR DETAILS AND REMOVES YOU FROM YOUR OWN PAGE. COPY AND SPREAD THE WORD

Although there are many scams and attacks which spread on Facebook every day, no-one appears so far to actually have gathered any evidence that this one exists – and there is probably more nuisance being caused by users passing on the warning than by any attack which may or may not have happened.

Users believe they’re doing the right thing when they share warnings like this – but unfortunately they haven’t always checked their facts.

Please don’t share security warnings with your online friends until you have checked them with a credible source (such as an established computer security company). Threats can be killed off fairly easily, but misinformation like this can live on for months, if not years, because people believe they are “doing the right thing” by sharing the warning with their friends.

If you’re a regular user of Facebook, be sure to join the Sophos page on Facebook to be kept informed of the latest security threats.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

Dad catches daughters on webcam: Beware viral Facebook video link

Image representing Facebook as depicted in Cru...

Image via CrunchBase

Facebook is being hit by another viral message, spreading between users’ walls disguised as a link to a saucy video.

The messages, which are spreading rapidly, use a variety of different links but all claim to be a movie of a dad catching his daughters making a video on their webcam:

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

[VIDEO] DAD CATCHES DAUGHTERS ON WEBCAM [OMGGGG].AVI
[LINK]
two naughty girls get caught in the WORST moment while making a vid on their webcam! omg!!

The messages also tag some of the victims’ Facebook friends, presumably in an attempt to spread the links more quickly across the social network.

If you make the mistake of clicking on the link you are taken to a webpage which shows a video thumbnail of two scantily clad young women on a bed. The page urges you to play the video, however doing so will post the Facebook message on your own wall as a “Like” and pass it to your friends.

Unfortunately, the new security improvements announced by Facebook this week fail to give any protection or warning about the attack.

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

When I tested the scam Sophos was presented with a (fake) message telling me that my Adobe Flash plugin had crashed and  needed to download a codec.

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

Codec downloadUsers should remember that they should only ever download updates to Adobe Flash from Adobe’s own website – not from anywhere else on the internet as you could be tricked into installing malware.

Ultimately, you may find your browser has been redirected to a webpage promoting a tool for changing your Facebook layout, called Profile Stylez and – on Windows at least – may find you have been prompted to install a program called FreeCodec.exe which really installs the Profile Stylez browser extension.

ProfileStylez

It’s certainly disappointing to see Facebook’s new security features fail at the first major outbreak – clearly there’s much more work which needs to be done to prevent these sorts of messages spreading rapidly across the social network, tricking users into clicking on links which could be designed to cause harm.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

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