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Visit the New Facebook? Hacker warning spreads like wildfire on social network

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Image via CrunchBase

Facebook users are posting warnings to one another about a hacker operating on the network, using the offer to “Visit the new Facebook” to break into pages and kick out the page’s legitimate administrators.

Unfortunately the alerts do not include enough information to be useful, and members of the public may be unwittingly perpetuating a hoax in the belief that they are helping their friends, family and online chums avoid a nasty virus infection.

Visit the new Facebook warning

THIS NOTICE IS DIRECTED TO EVERYONE WHO HAS A PAGE ON FACEBOOK: IF SOME PEOPLE IN YOUR PROFILE OR YOUR FRIENDS SEND YOU A LINK WITH WORDS "VISIT THE NEW FACEBOOK '' AND THERE IS THE LINK BELOW, DO NOT OPEN! IF YOU OPEN IT YOU CAN SAY GOODBYE TO YOUR PAGE. IT'S A HACKER WHO STEALS YOUR DETAILS AND REMOVES YOU FROM YOUR OWN PAGE. COPY AND SPREAD THE WORD

Although there are many scams and attacks which spread on Facebook every day, no-one appears so far to actually have gathered any evidence that this one exists – and there is probably more nuisance being caused by users passing on the warning than by any attack which may or may not have happened.

Users believe they’re doing the right thing when they share warnings like this – but unfortunately they haven’t always checked their facts.

Please don’t share security warnings with your online friends until you have checked them with a credible source (such as an established computer security company). Threats can be killed off fairly easily, but misinformation like this can live on for months, if not years, because people believe they are “doing the right thing” by sharing the warning with their friends.

If you’re a regular user of Facebook, be sure to join the Sophos page on Facebook to be kept informed of the latest security threats.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

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Dad catches daughters on webcam: Beware viral Facebook video link

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Image via CrunchBase

Facebook is being hit by another viral message, spreading between users’ walls disguised as a link to a saucy video.

The messages, which are spreading rapidly, use a variety of different links but all claim to be a movie of a dad catching his daughters making a video on their webcam:

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

[VIDEO] DAD CATCHES DAUGHTERS ON WEBCAM [OMGGGG].AVI
[LINK]
two naughty girls get caught in the WORST moment while making a vid on their webcam! omg!!

The messages also tag some of the victims’ Facebook friends, presumably in an attempt to spread the links more quickly across the social network.

If you make the mistake of clicking on the link you are taken to a webpage which shows a video thumbnail of two scantily clad young women on a bed. The page urges you to play the video, however doing so will post the Facebook message on your own wall as a “Like” and pass it to your friends.

Unfortunately, the new security improvements announced by Facebook this week fail to give any protection or warning about the attack.

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

When I tested the scam Sophos was presented with a (fake) message telling me that my Adobe Flash plugin had crashed and  needed to download a codec.

Dad catches daughters on webcam message

Codec downloadUsers should remember that they should only ever download updates to Adobe Flash from Adobe’s own website – not from anywhere else on the internet as you could be tricked into installing malware.

Ultimately, you may find your browser has been redirected to a webpage promoting a tool for changing your Facebook layout, called Profile Stylez and – on Windows at least – may find you have been prompted to install a program called FreeCodec.exe which really installs the Profile Stylez browser extension.

ProfileStylez

It’s certainly disappointing to see Facebook’s new security features fail at the first major outbreak – clearly there’s much more work which needs to be done to prevent these sorts of messages spreading rapidly across the social network, tricking users into clicking on links which could be designed to cause harm.

Source :- http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

You Can Now Tag Pages in Facebook Photos

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Image via CrunchBase

Ever had the urgent need to tag the Coke can you’re holding in that beach picnic picture on Facebook? Well, now you can, as the social network has added the ability to tag Pages in Facebook photos.

Starting Wednesday (although the feature does not appear to be live yet), users will be able to tag Pages for Brands & Products as well as People (more options coming soon) in their Facebook photos.

Tagged photos will appear in the Photos tab of a Page, rather than on that Page’s Wall, and anyone can tag a Page — even if a user hasn’t “Liked” it. Page admins can also nix photos from the tab by going into Edit Page > Posting Options > and unchecking “Users can add photos.”

For those who concerned about their privacy, Facebook assures us that privacy settings will still apply; if your photos are visible to everyone, everyone will be able to see the tagged snap, and if your photos are set to “only friends,” only friends will be able to check out that pic of you standing in front of the local Rite Aid.

This move could definitely be beneficial to certain brands. Imagine if people started tagging themselves wearing, say, Levi’s jeans. All of those snaps would then go to the Levi’s Facebook Page and result in free advertising.

Source :- http://mashable.com

7.5 Million Facebook Users Are Younger Than 13

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Image via CrunchBase

Some 7.5 million Facebook users over the past year were younger than 13, according to a Consumer Reportssurvey.

The report, made public on Tuesday, is based on a survey of 2,089 members of a TNS interactive consumer panel. Using that sample, the magazine was able to estimate that more than 5 million Facebook users are 10 years old and younger, making up the bulk of the 7.5 million figure. Facebook’s terms of service require users to be at least 13 years old. To join, though, users merely have to enter their supposed birth dates when they sign up.

But Facebook’s screening requirements for minors may be a moot topic. In a statement, Jeff Fox, technology editor for Consumer Reports, said the majority of parents of kids 10 and under “seemed largely unconcerned by their children’s use of the site.”

Reps from Facebook could not be reached for comment.

This isn’t the first time Facebook’s policies on minors have been called into question. A class action suit filed in August in Los Angeles alleged that Facebook’s “Like” button triggered instances in which minors were endorsing products without their parents’ consent.

Source :- http://mashable.com

Osama Bin Laden Is Dead Facebook Page Goes Viral

A still of 2004 Osama bin Laden video

Image via Wikipedia

Within about two hours of reports first surfacing (and since confirmed by the President) that Osama Bin Laden had been killed, a Facebook Page titled “Osama Bin Laden is DEAD” has already accumulated more than 150,000 “likes.”

The page appears to be adding thousands of likes by the minute with users also sharing hundreds of comments and links to stories about the news.

Interestingly, the page itself appears to have been setup well prior to tonight as a way to advocate the theory that Bin Laden had actually died long ago.

The page description reads in part: “Osama Bin Laden has not been found and will never be found because he died a long time ago. This may be news to you because it wasn’t in the news. His death is critical to the CIA because they want you to believe in this so called ‘War on terror’ which has made the world a more dangerous place. If Osama Bin Laden was alive, he would’ve been found – just like Saddam Hussein.”

Nonetheless, the page is now serving as a real-time discussion board for the historic news.

Source:- http://mashable.com

Unfollowed Me rogue application spreads virally on Twitter

Once again Twitter users are finding themselves hit by a fast-infecting attack, more commonly encountered by their Facebook-using cousins: a rogue application spreading virally across the network.

Thousands of Twitter users have fallen into the trap of allowing rogue third-party applications access their Twitter accounts, believing that it would tell them how many people have unfollowed them.

42 people have unfollowed me, find out how many have unfollowed you

A typical message reads:

58 people have unfollowed me, find out how many have unfollowed you: [LINK] #rw2011 #duringsexplease #youneedanasswhoopin

See the hashtags? They appear to be currently trending phrases on Twitter – presumably the rogue applications are using them in the messages they spam out in an attempt to trick more users into clicking on the links.

If you do click on the link you are asked to give authorisation for a third-party application to access your Twitter account.

Rogue application on Twitter

Don’t, whatever you do, press the “Allow” button. If you do, then a third party is now capable of tweeting messages in your name to all of your Twitter followers – which spreads the scam virally across Twitter and may result in one of your online friends also having their account compromised.

So, how do the scammers make money? That’s the next piece of the jigsaw.

You’re anxious to find out who has unfollowed you on Twitter. The scammers take advantage of that by presenting a webpage which looks as if it’s about to reveal that information – but is actually designed to make you take an online survey instead.

Rogue application survey scam

The scammers make money for each survey that is completed.

If you were unfortunate enough to grant one of these rogue applications access to your Twitter account, revoke its rights immediately by going to the Twitter website and visiting Settings/Connections and revoking the offending app’s rights.

Revoke rogue app rights

(Note that the scammers are using a variety of different applications – so you may see a different name from the one I picture above).

Don’t make it easy for scammers to make money in this way, and always exercise caution about which third party apps you allow to connect with your social networking accounts.

If you’re on Twitter and want to learn more about threats, be sure to follow Naked Security’s team of writers.

Source : – http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com

For Students, What Is the “Facebook Effect” on Grades?

Social media has several effects on academic work— some more positive than others. But what is social networking’s overall impact on college students’ performance?

According to data gathered from several sources by OnlineEducation.net, Facebook and Twitter are used to great benefit — sometimes. Students welcome online engagement and resources; around 75% of student respondents said they’d like to do some online collaboration for class, in fact.

Also, social media may have a positive impact on students’ sense of themselves in the community. Social media-using students were twice as likely as other students to feel well-liked by their peers and to participate in extracurricular activities. And 20% more of Facebook-using students (as compared to students who didn’t use Facebook) said they felt connected to their school and community.

However, negative effects abound. Students who use Facebook and hit the books simultaneously found their multitasking led to 20% lower grades than those of their more focused peers. Facebook-using students also made less money during school from part-time work, putting in around five hours per week as opposed to 16 hours per week for a typical, unplugged counterpart.

Not only do grades and finances suffer, but students might actually end up feeling more depressed or lonely. Almost half of students believe they are sadder than their friends on Facebook, and 25% of college students have shown signs of severe depression in their status updates at one time or another.

In a word, the results are inconclusive. But with around 96% of all college students on Facebook, only the most dedicated academics would consider giving up social media for a slightly better GPA.

In the comments, we’d like to know what impact social media had or has on your academic work. And if your college career pre-dates social media, how do you think college is better or worse because of Facebook?

Source -: http://mashable.com

Friendster Gets A Major Makeover.

Log on to Friendster today and you’ll see a background image that says ‘Watch this face! … on December 4′. Turns out the pioneering social network is in for a major revamp tomorrow, including a new logo, tagline (“Connecting Smiles”) and an entirely fresh look.

Friendster outlines some of the changes in a video (embedded below), in which it calls out other social networks (*cough* Facebook and *cough* MySpace) for being plain and boring.

My absolute favorite part of the video: “I mean, if everyone’s there, woop de doo”.

Friendster in the clip says the redesign aims to place more emphasis on 3 pillars: Simple, Fun and Personal. The company also features glimpses of the new website lay-out, which looks a whole lot like Facebook in my opinion, but seemingly mixed with the customization capabilities of MySpace (e.g. it looks like you can change the background color of pages with a single click). Apologies for the blurry screenshot, but watch the video to see it in action.

Friendster, founded in 2001, has raised over $45 million in venture capital to date, and is sitting on some potentially lucrative IP. It’s no longer hot in the U.S. any way you look at it, but it’s most definitely still a big deal in the Asia/Pacific region.

So much so that last year the company appointed Richard Kimber as its new CEO (he used to head Sales and Operations in South East Asia for Google) and has openly started shopping itself to potential buyers in the region over the Summer.

Source :- http://techcrunch.com

Facebook Scam: Fake Event Invitation Claims To Show Who Viewed Your Profile

Another day, another Facebook profile scam.

This latest con, promising a peek at who has viewed your profile, is spreading via an event invite titled “WOW Now you can see anyone who looks at your profile!”

The invitation includes a link to a page that resembles a Facebook event page. Here, instructions guide you through copying and pasting a piece of javascript into your browser’s address bar, which you definitely don’t want to do.

Clicking the event’s “I’m Attending” button–don’t!–will likely push the scam to your friends’ news feeds.

In addition, an equally unsafe how-to video on getting free Facebook credits is embedded at the bottom of the phony page.

These kinds of Facebook scams surface frequently, sometimes as fake apps, other times as spammy Wall posts or instant messages. As usual, you should be wary of any Facebook event, app or message that promises to reveal who is looking at your profile.

If you’ve accidentally clicked on this invite, we recommend you remove all traces of the event from your news feed and wall, and double check your Facebook app settings.

Source : http://www.huffingtonpost.com

LinkedIn Launches Personalised News Aggregator

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Image via CrunchBase

Uses your profile information to give you news relevant to your profession

LinkedIn unveiled its brand new service  LinkedIn Today at a press conference today in California. The new service is a news aggregator that uses your LinkedIn account information to generate a feed of relevant news stories.  The service uses an algorithm to analyze the details in your profile to determine the kind of stories that would be conducive to your profession.

The service also allows news stories to be flagged in either from LinkedIn or from Twitter for those who have linked their Twitter accounts with LinkedIn. A similar effort is under way to incorporate Facebook likes to flag stories in a similar manner, but no immediate Facebook support is available at the moment. There’s also a plan to place LinkedIn share buttons on major news websites. LinkedIn’s iPhone app will also get Today service.

Check out the screenshot to see how the top story slideshow looks like. As expected the stories are relevant to your industry, so a tech journalist will get geeky feeds while someone more politically inclined will be have his feed full of scams and the likes. The stories get the typical LinkedIn networking tweak by displaying who shared the story and along with “Sections” of the main being created from each users’ LinkedIn profiles. You can add news stories from other fields as well.

LinkedIn Today seems to be more than a mere aggregator. It’s smart algorithm based feed uses your professional details to provide relevant news and also adds a social twist to the mix by letting professionals interact by sharing news stories, leading to conversations, contacts and hence job/business opportunities.

Source -: Techtree.com

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